Creamy fruit salad

Fruit

I found a can of fruit cocktail in my cabinet, as well as packs of all-purpose cream and condensed milk in the fridge. They’d been there since forever. And I remembered the fruit salad my sisters made last Christmas. So I made something similar.

Tasty! But I lacked one important ingredient: cheese. But the end result still burst with heavenly sweetness. My version of comfort food.

I guess now I have one dessert I can whip out in three easy steps.

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Omelet with hotdogs

A

Picture A

 

Picture B

Picture B

Compare Picture A and Picture B.

B is, of course, more beautiful. But it also has its faults.

Last week I tried to put hotdogs in my omelet (Picture A)…to considerable success (there was too much cheese).

So I tried doing something similar today (Picture B) — this time, with onions, tomatoes, and less cheese. It was supposed to be uber-amazing, except that I decided to put butter (too much of it) to cook the omelet. I could have just used olive oil to not make the egg stick to the pan. Well, I did use olive oil, but I ran out of it. Thus the butter. Because I didn’t want to use fatty cooking oil.

But the omelet looked and tasted well enough, especially the second serving. The first had all the butter, while the second one only had the remainder of what the first absorbed.

Along with plain rice and whole fried hotdogs, the meal was gooood.

Ode to carenderia food

Work takes me to different places in the Philippines. One of these places is Baras, Rizal. My office there has a carenderia beside it; it’s very convenient. Recently I often ended up eating there despite initial hesitations pertaining to sanitation and humidity.

Now I’m liking the food there. (Well, first of all, the store keepers are very hospitable. Just point out to them what you want, and they’ll magically zap into existence a rustic-but-clean-enough dining set on one of the better-looking tables. I’m really impressed.) So, yeah, I’m liking the food there now. Maybe because the cook (cooks?) really prepare them to be savory. That’s how we Filipinos want our food. If you want salty, there’s the range from menudo to afritada to caldereta to adobo. If you want sour, there’s sinigang. Bitter, there’s papaitan. Sweet, there’s halo-halo. Exotic, there’s labong and langka (bamboo shoots and jackfruit). That carenderia in Baras offers all, except the halo-halo.

Why am I saying all this? Maybe I’m just marveling at the food and the people who cooked them. And that thing about “food traditions” — they’re most evident in carenderias, which showcase various dishes, recipes of which were handed down from one generation to the next. No cookbooks!

Plate of pork

What I thought was going to be a quick cooking session turned out to be a drag — and used a lot of kitchen paper.

But it ended well. I marinated the pork in soy sauce and worcestershire sauce, and sprinkled in some rosemary. Very good! But I wish I had soaked it in the marinade longer for an even flavoring…

Pork

Quick mami

Sometimes, on cold nights, after a long and tiring day, all you want is a quick meal. For me, it means a warm noodle soup is in order.

To get this fix, I use instant mami with two eggs and, if available, onions and carrots and spring onions. I didn’t have carrots tonight. So I just added parsley and rosemary to give it some unusual twist. Plus some black pepper.

Finally I learned that instant mami is best cooked with low heat: eggs just right and, most important, noodles aren’t soggy.

Mami

Pasta al Pangrattato. Almost.

And so, I found the chance to cook my first dish out of Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution last week (yes, this blog post is too late, but at least I get to publish this; so).

As the the book warned, Pasta al Pangrattato was going to be quite dry, unlike most pasta dishes. I substituted many of the indicated ingredients — like dried thyme leaves instead of fresh ones, canned tuna instead of anchovies, and chili sauce instead of the real thing.

It turned out too spicy, but tolerable. Perhaps next time I should go easy with the chili and the thyme…

Pasta al Pangrattato

The revolution begins

Bragging 70% off its original price, the hardbound copy of Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution sat on National Book Store’s display table like a super creamy mango float.

I bought it.

Once I got home, I read the first few pages and leafed through all the rest with incremental zeal. I thought I just found the ‘beginner’s cookbook’ that’s so me: feasting on foods quick, sans frills, tasty, and cheap.

Next Saturday, I still start probably with Chicken and Leek Stroganoff. 🙂

Oliver

French piece

I did my first French toast today yesterday. Too bad I didn’t have cinnamon. But the vanilla and butter and milk turned out okay. I had fun immersing the bread into the egg-milk-vanilla concoction and frying it to a golden brown and somewhat puffed up because of the eggs.

French Toast

And then I added an omelet for more fun. Plus the yogurt — I don’t actually know why I suddenly threw it on the toast. The combination didn’t seem to go very well, so I immediately scraped it off; yummy.

But the toast wasn’t very good. It only looked very good. I suppose it’s the lack of flavor; cinnamon could really have made it awesome. I settled with honey to sweeten the food. It was okay.

Note to self: Buy cinnamon.

Update: This morning I re-fried the leftover toast. Not much difference from yesterday’s. Then I friend an egg using butter — tasty! And fatty.

French Toast Redux

Liking adobo sweet and dark

In hopes of replicating a caramelized version of the unofficial national food of the Philippines — adobo — I spent about two hours cooking this on Wednesday night.

Sweet adobo

It’s adobo, alright, but not caramelized. And it’s too dark brown — some parts are even black — but that’s just a sign of how savory it is. I also added a bit of honey to this; it made a slight difference, but just slight.

Three days later, the dish is still unfinished. It’s so flavorful that one meat cube requires about a cup of rice to enjoy. And every heating of the thing just makes it better than ever, like wine over time.

I’ll try doing this again, but with better ingredient proportions — and perhaps with pineapples.

Ye nameless, delish dish

So this is another of those nameless dishes I often end up with.

It begins with trying to do something “creative” with a can of tuna flakes and eggs. The latter ingredient has become some sort of staple because of its supposed protein content: I wanna gain weight!

Throw in some veggies in a spatter of olive oil, and voila — add the parsley for more green stuff.

Turns out yummy.

Tuna flakes